The Dallas Museum of Art is the First Venue for the National Tour of Takashi Murakami’s First Feature Length Film, Jellyfish Eyes

Artist Takashi Murakami will Participate in a Q&A with DMA Curator Gabriel Ritter Following the Screening of Jellyfish Eyes

Takashi Murakami's first live-action feature film Jellyfish Eyes (2013) will embark on a nine-stop screening tour of art institutions and cultural venues across the United States, launching at the Dallas Museum of Art on Thursday, May 1. The DMA is also one of few venues where Murakami will attend the screening and participate in a Q&A following the presentation of Jellyfish Eyes. The film combines Murakami's trademark anime-inspired visual aesthetic with broader themes of social change and self-empowerment. Blending computer-animated graphics and live-action cinematography, Jellyfish Eyes is a coming-of-age tale set in a post-Fukushima world, recalling Japanese monster films of the 1950s while embodying the promise of generational hope.

In his feature filmmaking debut, renowned visual artist Takashi Murakami transforms the classic cinematic trope of the new kid on the block into a genre-defying adventure. Having recently lost his father, young Masashi moves with his mother to a small city in the Japanese countryside. But when he discovers that their new apartment is already inhabited by a pint-sized, gravity-defying creature, Masashi begins to pull back the curtain on this sleepy town and finds that very little is what it appears to be.  As a connoisseur of Japanese popular culture, from children’s manga and anime to classic monster movies, Murakami packs his film with a delirious abundance of ideas and imagery. What other coming-of-age fantasy has romance, battling CGI avatars, nuclear intrigue, rival doppelgangers, and a giant monster?

Born in Tokyo in 1962, Takashi Murakami is one of the most influential and acclaimed artists to have emerged from Asia in the late twentieth century. His work has been exhibited extensively in venues around the world, including the Qatar Museum Authority; Palace of Versailles; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Brooklyn Museum; Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt; Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao; Fondation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain, Paris; Serpentine Gallery, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Jellyfish Eyes has a running time of 100 minutes and is presented in Japanese with English subtitles.  The Thursday, May 1 presentation is included in the DMA’s free general admission. Reservations are suggested in order to ensure a seat, reservations can be made at DMA.org/tickets.

About the Dallas Museum of Art
Established in 1903, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) ranks among the leading art institutions in the country and is distinguished by its innovative exhibitions and groundbreaking educational programs. At the heart of the Museum and its programs is its global collection, which encompasses more than 22,000 works and spans 5,000 years of history, representing a full range of world cultures. Located in the vibrant Arts District of downtown Dallas, the Museum welcomes more than half a million visitors annually and acts as a catalyst for community creativity, engaging people of all ages and backgrounds with a diverse spectrum of programming, from exhibitions and lectures to concerts, literary events, and dramatic and dance presentations. In January 2013, the DMA returned to a free general admission policy and launched DMA Friends, the first free museum membership program in the country, which enrolled 50,000 members in its first year.

The Dallas Museum of Art is supported, in part, by the generosity of DMA Partners and donors, the citizens of Dallas through the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs, and the Texas Commission on the Arts.